History

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EnDev’s Foundation

During the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, the Dutch Government announced to provide access to drinking water and modern energy services to 10 million poor people by 2015. In order to accomplish the energy goal, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA NL) joined forces with the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

The partnership was called Energising Development and started in 2005. The initiative had strong characteristics: clear outcome targets i.e. the number of people provided with sustainable modern energy services as an indicator, a high commitment of involved governments and a competition between the implementing projects in different countries to reach the outcome targets.

After finishing its first phase in 2009, further donors joined, namely the Norwegian, Australian, British and Swiss government, as well as implementing organisations such as Stichting Nederlandse Vrijwilligers (SNV), MAEVE, Humanistisch Instituut voor Ontwikkelingssamenwerking (Hivos), PracticalAction, Association pour le Développement de l'Energie Solaire (ADES) and Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program Inc. (CLASP). Since then, harmonisation of donor efforts is a key element to improve the effectiveness of development cooperation and an important contribution to achieving sustainable development, as declared in the OECD/DAC Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. EnDev is a good example of how donor harmonisation and delegated cooperation can increase the overall impact of interventions by combining resources, avoiding duplication of efforts, and achieving economies of scale. Read more about Donors & Partners.

EnDev Phase 1 Achievements

For EnDev, the objective in phase 1 (2005 – 2009) was to provide sustainable access to modern energy services to 3.1 million people by supporting access for households, social institutions and small businesses in developing countries. However, EnDev was able to provide 5.1 million people with energy access in its phase 1. For more information about country measures, see Countries.